The Day After ÖtillÖ – How the body recovers

WoW, what a race.

Tough conditions and challenging elements, just like it should be. ÖtillÖ really presented itself from its best side, the raw beautiful nature!

And still we saw sub-8 hour times!

But how does +75 km of fighting in these harsh conditions affect the body, and what should you think about when trying to recover?

Apart from pizza and beer, there are some quick tips to have in mind, especially if you are a bit older.

Have a read below and remember that there are no short-cuts in the recovery process, which is highly individual.

Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP). “How the body recovers from an ultramarathon.” Science daily, 18         February 2016. 

Ultramarathon runners can expect an approximate five-to-seven-day subjective recovery post race, according to research presented this week at the Association of Academic Physiatrists Annual Meeting in Sacramento, Calif. The study also looked at factors that affect physical recovery and a runner’s ability to return to full running speed after participation in an ultramarathon.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160218062221.htm

(Full study can be found here http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02640414.2016.1183808 )

/The WoS Team

ÖtillÖ Hvar Swimrun Weekend & Race Report

The inaugural ÖtillÖ Hvar swimrun race was going to be a real challenge. Already on paper the course promised several tough challenges; swimming across a 3km open water stage, running on razor sharp rocks, climbing the many peaks of the islands, all while facing a strong and hot sun. The course was made out of some 35 km of running, nearly 11 k of swimming, with 20 transitions and tight cut-offs. Hvar, a popular destination in Croatia during high-season, seemed as a good place for a tough swimrun race.

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Hvar City Center and Start of the Race

The forecast looked promising with sunny conditions, albeit with a worrying 1-day storm coming in from the south.

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Gravity Race 2016

Emmanuel Charpentier shares his experience of the Annecy Gravity race where he competed alongside Yves Louis. The race takes place in France around the lake d’Annecy. It’s a hilly race: 5km Swim – 34.5km Run with 2100m of ascent.

After 20 years of athletics (Track and Cross-country) and 10 years of triathlon (All distances), I found myself yearning for more authentic and natural courses more specific to my profile as a swim-runner. So, I decided in 2015 to try my hand at the Troll Enez Morbihan… It was love at first sight! I had found a new form of adventure in Swimrun.

On the Friday before the race, I meet up with Yves Louis, originally from Besancon, who is an experienced trail runner and triathlete of 2 years (He did 13hrs15 in Embrun in 2015). It’s raining and it’s hard to imagine that sunshine has been forecast for the day after next. We’re going to test out swimming roped together to decide whether to do it on race day. After a short time trying them out, we decide to go with the rope. We also discover that the water is not exactly what you would call warm. (14-15° with lows of 5° in the last 15 days).

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Hellas Frostbite Winter Swimrun – Race Report

So, why do you willingly enrol in a race that takes place, in Sweden… in December?

C:\Users\niklas.karlsson\Dropbox\IMG_20161130_210754.jpgWell. I really don’t have a good answer for this except for being part of something epic-in-creation. I did my 1st swimrun back in 2009, ÖtillÖ, a race at the time unheard of and subjected to all kinds of adventures. It suited us who liked taking on unknown challenges and to sort out problems as they came along. Sharing the feeling with friends, the sense of camaraderie and being part of something undefined and epic. The Hellas Frostbite Swimrun Race is very much like this. It’s new and unheard of and you really don’t know what to expect. I did the 1st race in 2015 and that year it was more correct to call it the Hellas semi-Frosbite race since it was plus few degrees and no snow nor ice. This year it was totally different. Forecast was for -6, snow, winds and an expected ice sheet covering the lake. A true Frostbite challenge.

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Race report: Swimrun North Carolina

image-9Misty Becerra and Sophia Chadwick share with us their experience at the inaugural SwimRun North Carolina which took place on October 30th, 2016 in Hanging Rock State Park, USA. Third state to host a swimrun, North Carolina is a beautiful place, another nice sport for swimrunning. Photos © Brian Fancher Photography

I had just returned back to Victoria British Columbia after traveling to Sweden for ÖtillÖ when I received a message from Misty Becerra. She had received my name from a friend of a friend of an acquaintance (we still aren’t sure how it all transpired) who said I might be interested in teaming up with her for SwimRun NC. I quickly looked up who this Misty person was and saw that she had done ÖtillÖ in 2015 + 2016, was based out of Florida, and was a super endurance athlete. Feeling pretty accomplished after having finished ÖtillÖ ten days prior, I figured that this was a pretty awesome experience that I couldn’t really pass up. Within an hour I had responded to Misty, asked my boss for the weekend off (who said something along the lines of: “You can’t say no to this Sophia!” – it is SO helpful to have an avid endurance junkie as your boss!), bounced the idea off my boyfriend and mom (“I’m not totally crazy to race with a stranger am I?!”), and booked my flight. I had just under 6 weeks to dust off my paddles and pull-buoy, Icebugs, and burn off the delicious Swedish bread and salted butter (seriously – sooo good).

Unfortunately the lead up didn’t go exactly to plan (but when does it ever). I was working extremely long days, had a ton of commitments and was dealing with a dog that decided as soon as he turned one, he was going to turn into a rebellious teenager. Swims started to fall by the wayside, runs became short (but sweet), and fatigue quickly set in.

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