How to improve your swimrun in only 5 weeks time

Train less and smart and still improve your swimrun performance!

High-intensity intermittent training (HIIT) is an interval training exercise where you perform short periods of high-intensity training, which is followed by a much shorter and significantly low-intensity period. You basically repeat this until you are too tired to continue.

Normally, this way of training will take no more than 30 minutes, excluding warm-up and cool-off, which is excellent if you have little time to spare. HIIT works for everyone, beginner as well as pro. Just listen to you body and avoid pushing yourself over the top and risk pulling an injury.

Remember that motivation is key! 

So, if you run to work every now and then, instead of just going straight in your regular tempo, try doing it the HIIT-way by breaking up the stretch into segments where you run fast, preferably on threshold-level, and walk in-between. The same goes for swimming. If you frequent the 25 meter lane, try to go fast the 1st 15-20 meters and then just glide towards the end catching your breath, and repeat.

According to the study, you’ll get distinct results in only 5-weeks time, all while training less! A win-win under many circumstances or as is concluded;

The major finding of the present study was that the inclusion of a HIIT-based running plan with a reduction in training volume /…/ increased athletic performance during a sprint-distance triathlon [both in swimming and running time]. Conversely, the triathletes from the CG [Control Group], who continued their usual high-volume and low-/moderate-intensity training program, did not experience significant changes in muscular performance parameters or racing times.

😀

Remember that you can also use the HIIT training technique during the season as well, and here is why.

/The WoS Team

Read the full study here.

A HIGH INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING (HIIT) – BASED RUNNING PLAN IMPROVES ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE BY IMPROVING MUSCLE POWER

FELIPE GARCIA-PINILLOS, JOSE C. CAMARA-PEREZ, VICTOR M. SOTO-HERMOSO, PEDRO A. LATORRE-ROMA´N

This study aimed to examine the effect of a 5-week high-intensity intermittent training (HIIT)-based running plan on athletic performance and to compare the physiological and neuromuscular responses during a sprint-distance triathlon before and after the HIIT period. 2 groups: the experimental group (EG) and the control group (CG). The CG was asked to maintain their normal training routines, whereas the EG maintained only their swimming and cycling routines and modified their running routine.

No significant differences between groups were found before HIIT intervention. Significant group-by-training interactions were found in vertical jumping ability and athletic performance: the EG improved jumping performance, swimming performance and running time during the competition, whereas the CG remained unchanged

Low-volume, HIIT-based running plan combined with the high training volumes of these triathletes in swimming and cycling improved athletic performance during a sprint-distance triathlon.

Risks and dangers for racers in Swimrun

As a prelude to the discussion about the risks of Swimrun on the body, it seems essential to present this activity in full expansion in Europe and throughout the world.

There were 40 races in Europe (2-3 countries maximum) but today there are more than 50 events in France alone. France being the second nation after Sweden the cradle of the discipline in terms of race and competitor.

But this is important, the Swimrun is also in his mind outside the races in training sessions or simply sharing a sporting moment with other people. For a while, communities are forming and outings are organized without any goal to go towards the competition but only enjoy the moment. Some even engage in adventure roaming Swimrun by transporting bivouac equipment like The Swimrun Mediterranean raid last June or the expedition to Lake Baikal scheduled in the summer of 2018.

 

Continue reading “Risks and dangers for racers in Swimrun”

The Day After ÖtillÖ – How the body recovers

WoW, what a race.

Tough conditions and challenging elements, just like it should be. ÖtillÖ really presented itself from its best side, the raw beautiful nature!

And still we saw sub-8 hour times!

But how does +75 km of fighting in these harsh conditions affect the body, and what should you think about when trying to recover?

Apart from pizza and beer, there are some quick tips to have in mind, especially if you are a bit older.

Have a read below and remember that there are no short-cuts in the recovery process, which is highly individual.

Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP). “How the body recovers from an ultramarathon.” Science daily, 18         February 2016. 

Ultramarathon runners can expect an approximate five-to-seven-day subjective recovery post race, according to research presented this week at the Association of Academic Physiatrists Annual Meeting in Sacramento, Calif. The study also looked at factors that affect physical recovery and a runner’s ability to return to full running speed after participation in an ultramarathon.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160218062221.htm

(Full study can be found here http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02640414.2016.1183808 )

/The WoS Team

Swimrun Health Dangers on Land and Water

It’s time!

The season and the training kicks in. Take care out there and don’t forget about all the dangers!

/The Wos Team

*Originally posted in 2016*

Swimrun is a sport that has great health benefits, there can be no doubt about it. Swimming and running outdoors ensures you get a full body workout whilst filling up your reserves of vitamin D from the sun. Changing between swimming and running is great for not overstraining muscles and running and swimming on uneven terrain and in open water engages far more important core muscles than in a static controlled environment. So you might wonder why we should take some of the fun out of it by bringing up rare dangers that are unlikely to affect you. Well, simply because by being aware of these dangers and the necessary precautionary measures might help you avoid the risks altogether and let you head out knowing you will be at minimal risk of serious consequences. Continue reading “Swimrun Health Dangers on Land and Water”

Training and sex, or is it the other way around?

Credit: Digital romance 

Train as little as possible, or at least very short sessions to have more sex!

Pre-season is almost over and training focus will now shift from building strength and stamina towards improving overall speed, trying to hit the performance peak just before the next race.

Training with the aim to win, or to position oneself in the top-tier, comes with many benefits and some disadvantages. For many, this type of training focus helps structure general life, have positive impact on overall health, well-being and specifically on lower body weight, aerobic and anaerobic fitness, cardiovascular health and so on. This well-being is also interconnected to cognitive and mental health.

Continue reading “Training and sex, or is it the other way around?”