The Day After ÖtillÖ – How the body recovers

WoW, what a race.

Tough conditions and challenging elements, just like it should be. ÖtillÖ really presented itself from its best side, the raw beautiful nature!

And still we saw sub-8 hour times!

But how does +75 km of fighting in these harsh conditions affect the body, and what should you think about when trying to recover?

Apart from pizza and beer, there are some quick tips to have in mind, especially if you are a bit older.

Have a read below and remember that there are no short-cuts in the recovery process, which is highly individual.

Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP). “How the body recovers from an ultramarathon.” Science daily, 18         February 2016. 

Ultramarathon runners can expect an approximate five-to-seven-day subjective recovery post race, according to research presented this week at the Association of Academic Physiatrists Annual Meeting in Sacramento, Calif. The study also looked at factors that affect physical recovery and a runner’s ability to return to full running speed after participation in an ultramarathon.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160218062221.htm

(Full study can be found here http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02640414.2016.1183808 )

/The WoS Team

Does the cooling effect in swimrun let you go longer and harder?

Why does it feel like you can swimrun forever? Well, sort of.

When running on that hard and long stage in the sun heating up in you wetsuit, many of us have experienced fighting with these nasty thoughts of giving up. Overheating can be really tough on your physical performance and also on your psyche. But then you hit the waterline, swim for a short distance and feel the cool water trickling down on the inside of the wetsuit, and all of a sudden you feel like a champion again.

But why?

After a longer swim you can feel really strong again, which probably has to do with the switch of discipline and the following recovery, i.e. when not using the same sets of muscles swimming as running. But scientific research seem to suggest that another reason behind this could be the cooling effect. Some studies suggest that the temperature of the water do play an important role in prolonging this sensation of being able to ‘swimrun forever’. Or at least to recover enough between the stages so that one can finish the much dreaded ÖtillÖ course.

Perhaps even the mega-260km-challenge SAUC!

Pic: Huffington Post

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